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Oracle is best!! no SQL Server is best!! lets discuss !!

Posted by Praveen Kumar on May 13, 2008

Here its a hot discussion is going to start, some people say Oracle is best! and some says SQL Server is best!!

Lets see what we get conclusion

Platform comparison

SQL Server 2000 only works on Windows-based platforms, including Windows 9x, Windows NT, Windows 2000 and Windows CE.

In comparison with SQL Server 2000, Oracle 9i Database supports all known platforms, including Windows-based platforms, AIX-Based Systems, Compaq Tru64 UNIX, HP 9000 Series HP-UX, Linux Intel, Sun Solaris and so on.

Hardware requirements

To install SQL Server 2000, you should have the Intel or compatible platforms and the following hardware:

Hardware Requirements

Processor

Pentium 166 MHz or higher

Memory

32 MB RAM (minimum for Desktop Engine),
64 MB RAM (minimum for all other editions),
128 MB RAM or more recommended

Hard disk space

270 MB (full installation),
250 MB (typical),
95 MB (minimum),
Desktop Engine: 44 MB
Analysis Services: 50 MB minimum and 130 MB typical
English Query: 80 MB

To install Oracle 9i under the Intel or compatible platforms, you should have the following hardware:

Hardware Requirements

Processor

Pentium 166 MHz or higher

Memory

RAM: 128 MB (256 MB recommended)
Virtual Memory: Initial Size 200 MB, Maximum Size 400 MB

Hard disk space

140 MB on the System Drive
plus 4.5 GB for the Oracle Home Drive (FAT)
or 2.8 GB for the Oracle Home Drive (NTFS)

To install Oracle 9i Database under the UNIX Systems, such as AIX-Based Systems, Compaq Tru64 UNIX, HP 9000 Series HP-UX, and Sun Solaris, you should have the following hardware:

Hardware Requirements

Memory

A minimum of 512 MB RAM

Hard disk space

4.5 GB

Swap Space

A minimum of 2 x RAM or 400 MB, whichever is greater

Performance comparison

It is not easy to make the performance comparison between SQL Server 2000 and Oracle 9i Database. The performance of your databases depends rather from the experience of the database developers and database administrator than from the database’s provider. You can use both of these RDBMS to build stable and efficient system. However, it is possible to define the typical transactions, which used in inventory control systems, airline reservation systems and banking systems. After defining these typical transactions, it is possible to run them under the different database management systems working on the different hardware and software platforms.

Both SQL Server 2000 and Oracle 9i Database support the ANSI SQL-92 entry level and do not support the ANSI SQL-92 intermediate level.

T-SQL vs PL/SQL

The dialect of SQL supported by Microsoft SQL Server 2000 is called Transact-SQL (T-SQL).

The dialect of SQL supported by Oracle 9i Database is called PL/SQL.

PL/SQL is the most powerful language than T-SQL

Feature

PL/SQL

T-SQL

Indexes

B-Tree indexes,
Bitmap indexes,
Partitioned indexes,
Function-based indexes,
Domain indexes

B-Tree indexes

Tables

Relational tables,
Object tables,
Temporary tables,
Partitioned tables,
External tables,
Index organized tables

Relational tables,
Temporary tables

Triggers

BEFORE triggers,
AFTER triggers,
INSTEAD OF triggers,
Database Event triggers

AFTER triggers,
INSTEAD OF triggers

Procedures

PL/SQL statements,
Java methods,
third-generation language
(3GL) routines

T-SQL statements

Arrays

Supported

Not Supported

SQL Server 2000 and Oracle 9i limits

Feature

SQL Server 2000

Oracle 9i Database

database name length

128

8

column name length

128

30

index name length

128

30

table name length

128

30

view name length

128

30

stored procedure name length

128

30

max columns per index

16

32

max char() size

8000

2000

max varchar() size

8000

4000

max columns per table

1024

1000

max table row length

8036

25500

max query size

16777216

16777216

recursive subqueries

40

64

constant string size in SELECT

16777207

4000

constant string size in WHERE

8000

4000

Conclusion

It is not true that SQL Server 2000 is better than Oracle 9i or vice versa. Both products can be used to build stable and efficient system and the stability and effectiveness of your applications and databases depend rather from the experience of the database developers and database administrator than from the database’s provider. But SQL Server 2000 has some advantages in comparison with Oracle 9i and vice versa.


The SQL Server 2000 advantages:

  • SQL Server 2000 is cheaper to buy than Oracle 9i Database.

  • SQL Server 2000 holds the top TPC-C performance and price/performance results.

  • SQL Server 2000 is generally accepted as easier to install, use and manage.

The Oracle 9i Database advantages:

  • Oracle 9i Database supports all known platforms, not only the Windows-based platforms.

  • PL/SQL is more powerful language than T-SQL.

  • More fine-tuning to the configuration can be done via start-up parameters.
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4 Responses to “Oracle is best!! no SQL Server is best!! lets discuss !!”

  1. Waleed said

    Hi
    We are in 2008, and still comparing Oracle 9i to SQL Server 2000?
    This is not a fair comparison, compare Oracle 9i to SQL Server 2005 or SQL Server 2008.

    Regards

  2. Yeah Waleed, you are right. soon i will compare oracle 9i with SQL Server 2005 or SQL Server 2008. If you have some article on it please do post or write to me praveen.sunsetpoint@gmail.com

  3. Keith Nicholson said

    How about comparisons to 10g. I would be intersted in knowing the figures.

  4. Martin said

    How about comparing apples and pears? this is exactly what you are doing when comparing 9i to Sql Server 2005/8…

    Compare technologies on a like for like basis. so this should actually be Sql Server 2008 on Windows server against Oracle 11g on Windows server, or Sqlserver on Linux/Unix.. oh wait… you can’t.

    I think that may well give us an answer without even doing the comparison.

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